CIPR | Center For Inter-American Policy & Research

Tulane University

ALL RESOURCES

Jump to page:

Immigration, Latinos and 2016 Elections, CIPR Event Summary

On Friday, October 14, 2016, the Center of Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR) hosted a panel to discuss immigration, Latinos, and the upcoming presidential elections.…  read more

New IMF podcast featuring Nora Lustig on inequality in Latin America

Nora Lustig, the Samuel Z. Stone Professor of Latin American Economics and Director of the Commitment to Equity Institute (CEQI) at Tulane University, discusses about…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 26 (Spanish): El Impacto de los Impuestos y el Gasto Social en la Desigualdad y la Pobreza en El Salvador

El Impacto de los Impuestos y el Gasto Social en la Desigualdad y la Pobreza en El Salvador Working Paper No. 26 A working document…  read more

Regulators without Borders? Labor Inspectors in Latin America and Beyond

On April of 2015, Andrew Schrank, the Oliver Watson Professor of Sociology and International Studies at Brown University, gave a lecture titled Regulators without Borders:…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 33: Can a Poverty-Reducing and Progressive Tax and Transfer System Hurt the Poor?

Can a Poverty-Reducing and Progressive Tax and Transfer System Hurt the Poor? CEQ Working Paper No. 33 A working document by: Sean Higgins Tulane University…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 22: Fiscal Policy and Ethno-Racial Inequality in Bolivia, Brazil, Guatemala and Uruguay

Fiscal Policy and Ethno-Racial Inequality in Bolivia, Brazil, Guatemala and Uruguay Working Paper no. 22 A working document by: Nora Lustig Samuel Z. Stone Professor…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 27: Public Transfers and Poverty Reduction

Public Transfers and Poverty Reduction: An Evaluation of Program Contribution to the Exit Rate from Poverty of Children and the Elderly Working Paper No. 27…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 21: Inequality and top incomes in Uruguay: a comparison between household surveys and income tax micro-data

Inequality and top incomes in Uruguay: a comparison between household surveys and income tax micro-data Working Paper No. 21 A working document by: Gabriel Burdín…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 19: Inequality And Poverty In Uruguay By Race: The Impact Of Fiscal Policies

Inequality And Poverty In Uruguay By Race: The Impact Of Fiscal Policies Working Paper No. 19 A working document by: Florencia Amábile Universidad de la…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 18 (Spanish): Gasto Público Social, Impuestos, Redistribución Del Ingreso Y Pobreza En Costa Rica

Gasto Público Social, Impuestos, Redistribución Del Ingreso Y Pobreza En Costa Rica Working Paper No. 18 A working document by: Pablo Sauma Instituto de Investigaciones…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 18 (English): Social Public Spending, Taxes, Redistribution Of Income, And Poverty In Costa Rica

Social Public Spending, Taxes, Redistribution Of Income, And Poverty In Costa Rica Working Paper No. 18 A working document by: Pablo Sauma Instituto de Investigaciones…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 17: Gasto social, redistribución del ingreso y reducción de la pobreza en México: evolución y comparación con Argentina, Brasil y Uruguay

Gasto social, redistribución del ingreso y reducción de la pobreza en México: evolución y comparación con Argentina, Brasil y Uruguay Working Paper No. 17 A…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 16: Comparing The Incidence Of Taxes And Social Spending In Brazil And The United States

Comparing The Incidence Of Taxes And Social Spending In Brazil And The United States Working Paper No. 16 A working document by: Nora Lustig Tulane…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 15: Tax Reform in Latin America: A long term assessment

Tax Reform in Latin America: A long term assessment Working Paper No. 15 A working document by: Vito Tanzi Access the working document here: Updated…  read more

CEQ Working Paper No 14: Measuring Impoverishment: An Overlooked Dimension of Fiscal Incidence

Measuring Impoverishment: An Overlooked Dimension of Fiscal Incidence Working Paper No. 14 A working document by: Nora Lustig Tulane University Sean Higgins Tulane University Abstract…  read more

Jump to page:

LATEST SITE UPDATES

NEWS

EVENTS

PEOPLE

All Events

Upcoming Events

CIPR talk series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance to host political economist Dr. Katrina Burgess

View Full Event Description

Join the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Katrina Burgess as part of the fall speaker series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance, on Friday, November 16, in 110A Jones Hall. Dr. Burgess will give a talk titled Courting Migrants: How States Make Diasporas and Diasporas Make States.

The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.

Katrina Burgess (Ph.D., Princeton University) is Associate Professor of Political Economy of Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She is author of Parties and Unions in the New Global Economy, which won the 2006 Outstanding Book Award for the best publication on labor issues granted by the Section on Labor Studies and Class Relations of the Latin American Studies Association, and co-editor with Abraham F. Lowenthal of The California-Mexico Connection. She has also published numerous book chapters, as well as articles in World Politics, Latin American Politics & Society, Studies in Comparative International Development, South European Politics and Society, Comparative Political Studies, Politica y gobierno, and International Studies Review. Dr. Burgess has also served as Assistant Director of the U.S.-Mexico Project at the Overseas Development Council in Washington, D.C. and Associate Director of the California-Mexico Project at USC in Los Angeles.

Patterns of migrant engagement in politics back home cannot be understood without examining the ways in which homeland states reach out to their migrants. Since states engaged in what can be called diaspora-making are unable to deploy many of the tools of rule within their borders, they are especially reliant on the cultivation of loyalty. The agents, motives, and loyalty-cultivation strategies of diaspora-making have important implications for whether homeland parties mobilize voters abroad, as demonstrated by the contrasts between Mexico and the Dominican Republic.