CIPR | Center For Inter-American Policy & Research

Tulane University

Immigration, Latinos and 2016 Elections, CIPR Event Summary

On Friday, October 14, 2016, the Center of Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR) hosted a panel to discuss immigration, Latinos, and the upcoming presidential elections. Dr. Louis DeSipio (UC Irvine), Dr. Jennifer Merolla (UC Riverside), and Tom Wong (UC San Diego), presented their research and explained what their findings could mean for the upcoming election.
Dr. DeSipio presented research showing that immigration has become more salient in the American political arena due to increased immigration, greater activism within immigrant communities, and a growing native backlash against high levels of immigration. However, despite this rising salience, increased political polarization over the past 30 years has decreased the chances of comprehensive immigration reform.
Dr. Merolla presented work from her book Framing Immigrants: News Coverage, Public Opinion and Policy (Russell Sage, 2016). Along with her co-authors, Chris Haynes and S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, this work explores the seemingly conflicting views the public has on immigration.
For example, polls have shown that while a majority of people supported President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a majority of people also supported Arizona’s restrictive immigration law passed in 2010. Their findings indicate that how an issue is framed noticeably influences how that issue is perceived.
Dr. Wong spoke to the current political environment and discussed current Latino electoral participation and how “get out the vote” efforts influence voters. Arguing that while even a heated political environment may not increase voter turn out, preliminary research showed that utilizing phone-canvassing scripts that emphasize certain messages over others can actually increase participation.
Overall, this panel brought together scholars and researchers from both the Tulane and wider academic communities. CIPR looks forward to continuing the discussion of this important issue on campus and encouraging further collaboration and research in the role immigration and immigrant communities play in the US political system.

For more information about this topic, please consult the most recent works by our panelists:
Jennifer Merolla, Chris Haynes and S. Karthick Ramakrishnan (2016) Framing Immigrants: News Coverage, Public Opinion and Policy.
Louis Desipio and Rodolfo O. de la Garza (2015) U.S. Immigration in the Twenty-First Century: Making Americans, Remaking America.
Tom Wong (forthcoming, 2016) The Politics of Immigration: Partisanship, Demographic Change, and American National Identity.&

This panel was organized by CIPR post-doctoral fellow Rachel Navarre

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CIPR talk series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance to host political economist Dr. Katrina Burgess

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Join the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Katrina Burgess as part of the fall speaker series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance, on Friday, November 16, in 110A Jones Hall. Dr. Burgess will give a talk titled Courting Migrants: How States Make Diasporas and Diasporas Make States.

The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.

Katrina Burgess (Ph.D., Princeton University) is Associate Professor of Political Economy of Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She is author of Parties and Unions in the New Global Economy, which won the 2006 Outstanding Book Award for the best publication on labor issues granted by the Section on Labor Studies and Class Relations of the Latin American Studies Association, and co-editor with Abraham F. Lowenthal of The California-Mexico Connection. She has also published numerous book chapters, as well as articles in World Politics, Latin American Politics & Society, Studies in Comparative International Development, South European Politics and Society, Comparative Political Studies, Politica y gobierno, and International Studies Review. Dr. Burgess has also served as Assistant Director of the U.S.-Mexico Project at the Overseas Development Council in Washington, D.C. and Associate Director of the California-Mexico Project at USC in Los Angeles.

Patterns of migrant engagement in politics back home cannot be understood without examining the ways in which homeland states reach out to their migrants. Since states engaged in what can be called diaspora-making are unable to deploy many of the tools of rule within their borders, they are especially reliant on the cultivation of loyalty. The agents, motives, and loyalty-cultivation strategies of diaspora-making have important implications for whether homeland parties mobilize voters abroad, as demonstrated by the contrasts between Mexico and the Dominican Republic.