CIPR | Center For Inter-American Policy & Research

Tulane University

Christopher Chambers-Ju

CIPR Post-Doctoral Fellow

Contact Info
cchambersju@tulane.edu

Department Affiliation
Center for Inter-American Policy and Research

Christopher Chambers Ju received his PhD in political science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2017.

His research examines the politics of education through a focus on teachers’ unions. Studying the cases of Argentina, Colombia, and Mexico, he examines why some teachers take to the streets while others form an organized voting bloc, with distinct relationships to political parties.

By focusing on teachers, Christopher seeks to shed light on broader dynamics of education policy-making and political change in contemporary Latin America.

Degrees

  • B.A., Amherst College, Political Science, 2004
  • M.A., University of Chicago, Social Science, 2007
  • M.A., University of California, Berkeley, Political Science, 2013
  • Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, Political Science, 2017

Research & Teaching Specializations: Political Science, Democratization, Teachers’ Unions, Colombia

Distinctions

  • UC Berkeley Travers Department of Political Science Fellowship, 2013
  • NA Ed/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship, 2014-2015
  • UC Berkeley Comparative Study of Right-Wing Movements Mini Grant, Mexico, 2012
  • John L. Simpson Memorial Research Fellowship, Mexico, 2011-2012
  • US Berkeley Graduate Division Summer Grant, Colombia, 2011
  • UC Berkeley Human Rights Center (HRC) Fellow, Colombia, 2009
  • University of Chicago Tinker Summer Research Grant, Peru, 2007
  • Fulbright IIE Scholar, Colombia, 2005-2006

Languages

  • Spanish

Overseas Experience

  • Argentina
  • Colombia
  • Mexico

Selected Publications

  • 2016. “The Mexican Teachers’ Union: The Politics of Patronage.” With Leslie Finger. In The Politics of Education: Teachers Unions in Comparative Perspective. Terry Moe and Susanne Wiborg, eds. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • 2014. “Data Collection, Opportunity Costs and Problem Solving: Lessons from Field Research on Teachers’ Unions in Latin America.” PS” Political Science & Politics 47(2)
  • 2014. “Teachers, Mayors, and the Transformation of Clientelism in Colombia.” With Kent Eaton. Clientelism, Social Policy and the Quality of Democracy Diego Abente Brun and Larry Diamond, eds. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • 2012. “Popular Representation in Contemporary Latin American Politics: An Agenda for Research.” With Ruth Berins Collier. Routledge Handbook of Latin American Politics Peter Kingstone and Deborah Yashar, eds. New York: Routledge.

Latin American-Related Courses Taught in Last 2 years: POLC 2300: Comparative Politics

Class:
Region:
Countries:

LATEST SITE UPDATES

NEWS

EVENTS

PEOPLE

All Events

Upcoming Events

CIPR talk series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance to host political economist Dr. Katrina Burgess

View Full Event Description

Join the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Katrina Burgess as part of the fall speaker series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance, on Friday, November 16, in 110A Jones Hall. Dr. Burgess will give a talk titled Courting Migrants: How States Make Diasporas and Diasporas Make States.

The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.

Katrina Burgess (Ph.D., Princeton University) is Associate Professor of Political Economy of Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She is author of Parties and Unions in the New Global Economy, which won the 2006 Outstanding Book Award for the best publication on labor issues granted by the Section on Labor Studies and Class Relations of the Latin American Studies Association, and co-editor with Abraham F. Lowenthal of The California-Mexico Connection. She has also published numerous book chapters, as well as articles in World Politics, Latin American Politics & Society, Studies in Comparative International Development, South European Politics and Society, Comparative Political Studies, Politica y gobierno, and International Studies Review. Dr. Burgess has also served as Assistant Director of the U.S.-Mexico Project at the Overseas Development Council in Washington, D.C. and Associate Director of the California-Mexico Project at USC in Los Angeles.

Patterns of migrant engagement in politics back home cannot be understood without examining the ways in which homeland states reach out to their migrants. Since states engaged in what can be called diaspora-making are unable to deploy many of the tools of rule within their borders, they are especially reliant on the cultivation of loyalty. The agents, motives, and loyalty-cultivation strategies of diaspora-making have important implications for whether homeland parties mobilize voters abroad, as demonstrated by the contrasts between Mexico and the Dominican Republic.