CIPR | Center For Inter-American Policy & Research

Tulane University

Moira Mackinnon

CIPR Post-Doctoral Fellow

Follow Moira’s Blogs

Moira MacKinnon is a 2010-2012 post-doctoral research fellow. She completed her PhD in sociology at the University of California, San Diego in 2009. Her dissertation is a comparative study of the passage of legislation on labor rights through the Chilean and Argentine Congresses in the first decades of the twentieth century. She also holds a Masters degree in Social Research from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has published Los Años Formativos del Partido Peronista (1946-1950), Buenos Aires: Instituto Di Tella- Siglo Veintiuno de Argentina Editores (2002), some articles on this topic and an edited volume, Populismo y Neopopulismo en América Latina.  El Problema de la Cenicienta, with Mario A. Petrone eds., EUDEBA (Editorial Universitaria de Buenos Aires), (1998, Reprinted 1999). Moira MacKinnon is a political and historical sociologist whose area of special interest is political institutions in Latin America, in particular Congress and political parties in the South Cone. She is working on a book manuscript based on her dissertation topic. Since leaving Tulane, Moira MacKinnon has accepted a faculty position in the Department of Social Science of the Universidad Tres de Febrero, Argentina, since February 2013.

Class:
RE/Special:
Region:
Countries:

LATEST SITE UPDATES

EVENTS

NEWS

MEDIA

RESOURCES

PEOPLE

All Events

Upcoming Events

Regulators without Borders? Labor Inspectors in Latin America and Beyond

View Full Event Description

Please join us for the Lecture & Luncheon, “Regulators without Borders? Labor Inspectors in Latin America and Beyond” by Andrew Shrank, Olive Watson Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs at Brown University.

RSVP Required. To reserve a spot or for more information, contact: cipr@tulane.edu

Sponsored by CIPR.

Description:
The substantial body of literature addresses the growth of transnational regulatory networks that purport to foster learning, legitimacy, and coordination among national regulatory agencies. But network membership is neither universal nor well understood. Are regulators more likely to go abroad when they are vulnerable to domestic political pressure, or when their independence and influence are intact?