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Tulane University

Venezuela's Income Disparity Contrary to Latin American Trends, Lustig's Inequality Study Shows

August 25th, 2010

August 25, 2010

Tulane Professor of Latin American Economics, Nora Lustig along with co-editor Luis F. López-Calva of the recently published Declining Inequality in Latin America: A Decade of Progress? were referenced in an article titled “Chavez’s Socialist Populism Perpetuates Inequality,” in Canada’s The Globe and Mail newspaper.

The article cites research from the Lustig and López-Calva study, ranking Venezuela behind 12 other nations in the region for income disparities between the rich and poor.

Read the complete article here: Chavez’s Socialist Populism Perpetuates Inequality

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A recent review of Lustig’s book in Foreign Affairs, a Council of Foreign Relations publication:

Latin America is infamous for its yawning gaps between the very rich and the very poor. It is big news, therefore, that this deeply entrenched disgrace is showing signs of reversal. Over the last decade, according to the number-crunching economists assembled in this book, inequality measurably declined in 12 of 17 countries. The volume attributes this to two factors: the massive expansion of elementary schooling during the past decades, which narrowed the earnings gap between high-skilled and low-skilled workers, and carefully targeted government programs that transferred cash to the poor. (Democratization has helped, too.) The persistence of this redistributive momentum will depend, the editors contend, on progressive tax reforms. This is an important, evidence-rich study that directly challenges the notion that globalization inevitably widens income gaps in developing nations. Foreign Affairs, 2010.

See more information on Declining Inequality in Latin America.

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Arturo Sotomayor: The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper, Lecture on November 7 at 4pm

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Please join us for a lecture by Dr. Arturo Sotomayor, assistant professor at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). Sotomayor will present his newest book The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper: Civil-Military Relations and the United Nations (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013).

The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper reevaluates how United Nations peacekeeping missions reform (or fail to reform) their participating members. It investigates how such missions affect military organizations and civil-military relations as countries transition to a more democratic system. Sotomayor's evaluation of Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay's involvement in the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti reinforces his final analysis – that successful democratic transitions must include a military organization open to change and a civilian leadership that exercises its oversight responsibilities.

Arturo Sotomayor is an assistant professor in the National Security Affairs Department at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), in Monterey, California. His areas of interest include civil-military relations in Latin America; UN Peacekeeping participation by South American countries; Latin American comparative foreign policy, and nuclear policy in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. His publications have appeared in Security Studies, International Peacekeeping, Journal of Latin American Politics and Society, Hemisphere, Nonproliferation Review and other edited volumes. He is the author of The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper: Civil-Military Relations and the United Nations (Johns Hopkins Press, 2014) and co-editor of Mexico's Security Failure (Routledge, 2011). Before joining the NPS in 2009, Sotomayor taught at the Center for Economic Research and Teaching (CIDE) in Mexico City, and was a post-doctoral fellow in the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR) at Tulane University. He received his M.A., M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Columbia University and his B.A. degree in international relations from the Technological Autonomous Institute of Mexico (ITAM).

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