CIPR | Center For Inter-American Policy & Research

Tulane University

Symposium: Venezuela from the Neutral Ground

January 28th, 2011
8:30AM - 6:30PM

Location
LBC Stibbs Conference Room 203, Uptown Campus
#14 on this LBC Building Map – Second Floor
Where is the LBC Building?
#29 on this Uptown Campus Map

The Center for Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR), the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and the Department of Political Science invite you the symposium, Venezuela from the Neutral Ground, where competing views on the "Chavista" phenomenon will be exchanged and examined in a neutral setting by 17 experts in the field. RSVP Required.

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QUICK LINKS:
SCHEDULE (with abstracts)
OFFICIAL FLYER
OFFICIAL INVITATION

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PROGRAM (PDF version – Please print before attending)

8:30-9:00 – Welcome and Opening Remarks

  • Tom Reese, Executive Director, Stone Center for Latin American Studies

9:00-10:00 – Session I

  • The Models of Radical Democracy & Social-Based Democracy in the Venezuela of Hugo Chávez
    Steve Ellner, Universidad de Oriente, Venezuela
  • The Logic of Bolivarian Democracy in Venezuela
    Daniel Levine, University of Michigan

10:00-10:15 – Coffee Break

10:15-11:45 – Session II

  • Electoral Authoritarianism and Dilemmas of the Opposition Parties in the Venezuela of Hugo Chávez
    Ángel E. Álvarez, Notre Dame University, Universidad Central de Venezuela
  • Venezuela’s 2010 Legislative Elections in a Comparative Perspective
    Manuel Alcántara, Notre Dame University, Universidad de Salamanca, Spain
  • Venezuela's Populism and Its Tendencies
    Margarita Lopez Maya, Universidad Central de Venezuela

11:45-12:45 – Session III

  • A Revolution for Whom? Measuring Political Bias in the Venezuelen Land Reform Using Maisanta
    Michael Albertus, Stanford University
  • The Changing Chavista Electoral Coalition
    Noam Lupu, Princeton University

12:45-1:45 – LUNCH

1:45-3:15 – Session IV

  • Role of the Media in a Polarized Society
    Jennifer McCoy, Georgia State University
  • The Government's (Tense) Relationship with the Academic and Professional Sectors
    Eugenio Hernández Bretón, Universidad Monteavila Law School, Venezuela
  • The Radicalization of Venezuelan Foreign Policy: Current Developments & Perspectives for the Coming Years
    María Teresa Romero, Universidad Central de Venezuela

3:15-4:30 – Session V

  • Socoilism in Venezuela: A Look at the Advantages and Disadvantages of Oil for Construction of Socialism
    Daniel Hellinger, College of Wooster
  • Varieties of Statism: Oil Policies (and Outcomes) in Venezuela and Brazil Compared
    Javier Corrales, Amherst College
  • Venezuela's Actually Existing Socialism
    David Smilde, University of Georgia

4:30-4:45 – Coffee Break

4:45-6:00 – Session VI

  • Venezuela and the Global Recession
    Ángel Eduardo Cárdenas, University of Toronto
  • Venezuela: Growth, Recession, and Recovery
    Mark Weisbrot, Center for Economic Policy and Research, Washington DC
  • The Venezuelan Economy and Oil Rentism
    José Manuel Puente, Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administración, IESA, Venezuela

6:00 – Final Session and Closing Remarks

  • Michael Coppedge, University of Notre Dame

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TO RSVP OR FOR MORE INFORMATION
angela.reed@tulane.edu
504.862.3141
cipr.tulane.edu
facebook.com/CIPR.TulaneUniversity

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Upcoming Events

Arturo Sotomayor: The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper, Lecture on November 7 at 4pm

View Full Event Description

Please join us for a lecture by Dr. Arturo Sotomayor, assistant professor at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). Sotomayor will present his newest book The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper: Civil-Military Relations and the United Nations (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013).

The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper reevaluates how United Nations peacekeeping missions reform (or fail to reform) their participating members. It investigates how such missions affect military organizations and civil-military relations as countries transition to a more democratic system. Sotomayor's evaluation of Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay's involvement in the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti reinforces his final analysis – that successful democratic transitions must include a military organization open to change and a civilian leadership that exercises its oversight responsibilities.

Arturo Sotomayor is an assistant professor in the National Security Affairs Department at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), in Monterey, California. His areas of interest include civil-military relations in Latin America; UN Peacekeeping participation by South American countries; Latin American comparative foreign policy, and nuclear policy in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. His publications have appeared in Security Studies, International Peacekeeping, Journal of Latin American Politics and Society, Hemisphere, Nonproliferation Review and other edited volumes. He is the author of The Myth of the Democratic Peacekeeper: Civil-Military Relations and the United Nations (Johns Hopkins Press, 2014) and co-editor of Mexico's Security Failure (Routledge, 2011). Before joining the NPS in 2009, Sotomayor taught at the Center for Economic Research and Teaching (CIDE) in Mexico City, and was a post-doctoral fellow in the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR) at Tulane University. He received his M.A., M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Columbia University and his B.A. degree in international relations from the Technological Autonomous Institute of Mexico (ITAM).

For flyer, click here.