CIPR | Center For Inter-American Policy & Research

Tulane University

Nora Lustig

Professor - Economics, Samuel Z. Stone Chair of Latin American Economics

Contact Info
nlustig@tulane.edu

Department Affiliation
Economics

Nora Lustig is Samuel Z. Stone Professor of Latin American Economics and Director of the Commitment to Equity Institute (CEQ) at Tulane University. She is also a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the “Brookings Institution,“https://www.brookings.edu/program/global-economy-and-development/ the Center for Global Development and the Inter-American Dialogue. Professor Lustig‘€™s research is on economic development, inequality and social policies with emphasis on Latin America. Her most recent publication Commitment to Equity Handbook: Estimating the Impact of Fiscal Policy on Inequality and Poverty, (Brookings 2018) is a step-by-step guide to assessing the impact of taxation and social spending on inequality and poverty in developing countries. Prof. Lustig is a founding member and President Emeritus of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association (LACEA) and was a co-director of the World Bank‘€™s World Development Report 2000, Attacking Poverty. She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Economic Inequality and is a member of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality‘€™s Executive Council. Prof. Lustig served on the Atkinson Commission on Poverty, the High-level Group on Measuring Economic Performance and Social Progress, and the G20 Eminent Persons Group on Global Financial Governance. She received her doctorate in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Degrees
  • B.A., University of California-Berkeley, Economics, 1972
  • M.A., University of California-Berkeley, Economics, 1974
  • Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley, 1979
Academic Experience
  • Samuel Z. Stone Professor of Latin American Economics, Tulane University, 2009-
  • Non-resident Senior Fellow, Inter-American Dialogue, Washington DC, 2009-
  • Visiting Professor (sabbatical), Universidad Torcuato DiTella, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2016
  • J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Visiting Professor of International Affairs, George Washington University, 2008
  • Professor, Universidad de las Américas, 2001-2005
  • Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution, 1989-1997
Related Experience
  • Director, Commitment to Equity (CEQ), 2009-
  • Member of the Jury, Fundacion Vidanta Prize, 2013-
  • Coordinator, Latin American Economics Roundtable, Washington, DC, 2008-
  • Director, The Poverty Group, UNDP, New York, 2006-2007
  • President, Universidad de las Américas, 2001-2005
Distinctions
  • Tulane University School of Liberal Arts Outstanding Research Award, May 2012
  • Founding member and President, LACEA (Latin America and the Caribbean Economic Association), 1999-2000
Languages
  • Spanish
  • French
  • German
  • Portuguese
Overseas Experience
  • Mexico

Research & Teaching Specializations: Development Economics, Poverty and Income Distribution, Social Policies and Protection, Globalization, Mexico

Selected Publications
  • 2017. ‘€œFiscal Redistribution and Ethno-racial Inequality in Bolivia, Brazil and Guatemala,‘€ Latin American Research Review. Special Issue: Enduring and/or New Forms of Inequality in a Globalizing World. Edited by Philip Oxhorn and José R. Jouve-Martin, editors. 52(2): X.
  • 2016.‘€œDeclining Wages for College-Educated Workers in Mexico: Are Younger or Older Cohorts Hurt the Most?‘€ With Raymundo Campos-Vazquez and Luis F. Lopez-Calva Revista de Economía Mundial/World Economic Journal. No. 43.
  • 2016. ‘€œComparing the Incidence of Taxes and Social Spending in Brazil and the United States.‘€ With Sean Higgins, Whitney Ruble and Tim Smeeding Review of Income and Wealth, 62, S22-46.
  • 2016. ‘€œFiscal Policy, Income Redistribution and Poverty Reduction in Latin America: Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay.‘€ In Contemporary Issues in Development Economics, edited by Timothy Besley, 11-18. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK.
  • 2014. ‘€œSocial Spending and Income Redistribution in Argentina in the 2000s: the Rising Role of Noncontributory Pensions.‘€ In Public Finance Review 42(3).

Latin American-Related Courses Taught in Last 2 years:
ECON 4600: Inequality and Poverty in Latin America
, Economic Development Policy, Economic Development

Number of Dissertations or Theses Supervised in the Past 5 Years: 2

Full CV or Website
Curriculum Vitae
Commitment to Equity Institute
@noralustig (Twitter)
RePEc
Wikipedia
People in Economics
Academia.edu

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Upcoming Events

City, Community, and Culture Symposium VOICES

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The City, Culture, and Community (CCC) Annual Graduate Symposium will be held on February 15, 2019. The 2019 symposium, VOICES: Visibility, Orientation, Identity, Creativity, Environment, Spaces, seeks to understand creative approaches to how inequalities are negotiated: socially, culturally, and institutionally. All events will take place in Richardson Memorial Room 204.

The symposium will focus on research that explores creative approaches to agency, institutional organization, and cultural production and consumption within complex social systems. What are the current issues facing our communities, institutions, and cities? How can we be creative and inclusive in our approach? This symposium intends to create an interdisciplinary space that can bring together scholars, practitioners, students, and community members to engage across lines and extend current conversations around agency, resilience, and social justice across the globe.

The keynote speaker will be given by Dr. Ernesto Martinez, Associate Professor in Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon, on Friday, February 15 at 1:30 PM. In his keynote address Queer Arousals in Contexts of Racialized Harm, Dr. Martinez conducts an intersectional analysis of the ways that queer men of color negotiate epistemic injustice through the creation and consumption of film, literature, and art. His research interests include queer ethnic studies, women of color feminisms, US Latinx literature and culture, and literary theory. He is the author of “On Making Sense: Queer Race Narratives of Intelligibility‘€:https://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=22242 (Stanford UP, 2012) and “The Truly Diverse Faculty: New Dialogues in American Higher Education.‘€:https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137456052 (Palgrave, 2014). Along with his academic achievements, Dr. Martinez also writes bilingual Latinx children‘€™s books, produces films (La Sarentata, 2017), and serves as a board member for the Association for Jotería Arts, Activism, and Scholarship (AJAAS), a queer Latinx grassroots organization dedicated to producing art and analyzing culture and politics in the context of activism.

Populism: Latin America in Comparative Perspective

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Please join us next Friday, February 15 for a symposium:
Populism: Latin America in Comparative Perspective
This event will take place from 10am to 4:30 pm in the Greenleaf Conference Room, 100A Jones Hall
RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu
Please feel free to come listen to any or all of the following panels:

10:00 am – 12:00 pm: Panel 1: Populism and Democracy
  • “Populism as a Political Regime” Enrique Peruzzotti, CONICET-Di Tella University, Argentina
  • “Populism, Political Polarization and Democracy” Gerardo Aboy Carlés, CONICET-San Martin National University, Argentina
  • “Populism and Constitutional Adjudication in Latin America: Venezuela in Comparative Perspective” Raul Sanchez Urribarri, La Trobe University, Australia
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm: Panel 2: Populism, Parties and Ideology
  • “Populism, Chavismo, and the Non-Exempt Signifier” David Smilde, Tulane University
  • “Unity and Division in a Classic Populist Movement: The case of the Peronist Party” Moira MacKinnon, Tres de Febrero National University, Argentina
  • “A Populist Pope? The Myth of the Peronist Papacy” Humberto Cucchetti. CONICET- Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Laborales, Argentina
3:00 pm – 4:30 pm: Panel 3: Global Populism
  • “Is Interpresidentialism Populist? The Role of Chief Executives in Regional Integration” Andrés Malamud, Lisboa University, Portugal
  • “The Political Economy of Populism” Carlos Waisman, University of California, San Diego, USA
  • “A Provisional Balance of Latin American Neopopulism in Comparative Perspective with Europe” Manuel Anselmi, Unitelma Sapienza, Italy

The Liberace of Lucha Libre: An Evening with American-born Mexican luchador Cassandro

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Join the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South, the Newcomb Art Museum, Amigos de los Amigos, and krewedelusion in welcoming American-born Mexican luchador Saúl Armendáriz, or Cassandro, on Wednesday, February 20, 7:00 PM, in the Freeman Auditorium. Cassandro will speak about his personal story of growing up and training as a lucha libre in México. He became one of the first openly gay exóticos (a wrestler who dresses in a flamboyant style), and later he had the honor of being the first exótico to win a championship title.

Cassandro will speak about how he negotiated his gay identity and overcame adversity in the world of professional Mexican wrestling. He will also share his experiences outside of wrestling, as an LGBTQ activist, circuit speaker, and most recently as the subject of a feature documentary, Cassandro, The Exótico which received critical acclaim at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2018.

This event is free and open to the public. Parader and performer Antonio Garza will moderate.

For more information contact: New Orleans Center for the Gulf South via email dfrazier@tulane.edu, by phone (504-314-2889), or visit the event website.

Sponsored by: Newcomb Art Museum, Amigos de los Amigos, krewedelusion, and The New Orleans Center for the Gulf South.

Life without Lead: Contamination, Crisis, and Hope in Uruguay

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Join the Environmental Studies Program and the School of Liberal Arts at Tulane University in welcoming Daniel Renfrew, West Virginia University, who will giving a talk titled Life without Lead: Contamination, Crisis, and Hope in Uruguay on Thursday, February 21 at 5:00 PM in the Stone Auditorium as part of the EVST Focus on the Environment (FOTE) Speaker Series.

Life without Lead examines the social, political and environmental dimensions of a devastating lead poisoning epidemic. Drawing from a political ecology of health perspective, Daniel Renfrew situates the Uruguayan lead contamination crisis in relation to neoliberal reform, globalization, and the resurgence of the political Left in Latin America. He traces the rise of an environmental social justice movement and the local and transnational circulation of environmental ideologies and contested science. Through fine-grained ethnographic analysis, this book shows how combating contamination intersected with class politics, explores the relationship of lead poisoning to poverty, and debates the best way to identify and manage an unprecedented local environmental health problem.

Daniel Renfrew is an associate professor of Anthropology. He received a Ph.D. in anthropology from Binghamton University, State University of New York in 2007. Dr. Renfrew joined the WVU faculty in Fall 2008 after a year as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Towson University. Dr. Renfrew’s research interests span the environmental, urban, critical medical and political anthropology sub-fields, and his research draws from and contributes to interdisciplinary scholarship on political ecology, social movements, science and technology studies, and Latin American studies. His research has focused in particular on anthropological and political ecological analyses of environmental conflicts.

Critical Issues in Democratic Governance: Spring 2019 CIPR Series

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Latin America faces major threats to democratic governance, but there are also new opportunities for grassroots mobilization and social policy expansion. In Critical Issues in Democratic Governance the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research will host speakers to discuss emerging issues that have surfaced in democratic governance in the region. In Brazil, the AIDS movement constructed a powerful new advocacy coalition, with coordination between bureaucrats and activities. In Argentina and Brazil, there are sharp contrasts in the social welfare policies that governors and mayors have implemented, with profound consequences for livelihood of the poor and marginalized. Finally, the outbreak of violence across Latin America, under democratic regimes raises questions about how criminal organizations compete for influence over transnational illicit networks and infiltrate the state.

Spring 2019 Schedule

February 8, 2019
State-Sponsored Activism: Bureaucrats and Social Movements in Democratic Brazil
Jessica Rich, Marquette University

February 22, 2019
Uneven Social Policies: The Politics of Subnational Variation in Latin America
Sara Niedzwiecki, University of California, Santa Cruz

April 5, 2019
Homicidal Ecologies: Illicit Economies and Complicit States in Latin America
Deborah Yashar, Princeton University

Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.